Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 27 to 39 of 39

Thread: Voodoo

  1. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    23,462
    Quote Originally Posted by Hadriana View Post
    I use another system of magick, on almost a daily basis. Voodoo is too Christian and too African for me. I am neither. Hoodoo and voodoo I am both very familiar with, but I use what is comfortable and works for me. Hoodoo I like better, it generally works on the principles of lower magick, which I am fairly adept at.
    I never heard of Hoodoo, so what do I do? Wikipedia reference-linkHoodoo

    According to Wiki, Hoodoo is as African as is Voodoo. Anyhow, here is the result of my search if there are any other uninformed who might be interested.
    Last edited by Dera; 09-23-2007 at 11:31 PM.


    "Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn't pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children's children what it was once like in the United States where men were free." ~ Ronald Reagan

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,165
    I'd have to disagree with wiki up to a point. Hoodoo is not purely indigenous African magick. It is primarily lower natural magick, with a lot of imitative features which can also be found in Celtic, Welch, and Egyptian magick.

    Wiki is primarily referring to hoodoo AS practiced by former slaves, so there is a strong African countenance in that.

    However, hoodoo is also practiced by many whites, and could be considered as AMERICAN folk magick I think. It is to magick what Howard Finster is to art.

    It took root in Appalachia with the Celtic and Welch as surely as it did in the African slave quarters and in the native american camps. IN time, all races picked up this and that from other practicioners.

    My best description of hoodoo is intuitive natural imitative eclectic magick. There's no religion involved - it is a primal, unpracticed lower magick that people SENSE and DO, with bits and pieces passed down but no formal system and no formal study needed.

    It is the conjuring of thrush by the seventh son of a seventh son, and it is brickdust on the doorstep, and salt over the left shoulder.

    Here's a better article than wiki - by FAR.
    http://www.llewellynjournal.com/article/504

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,165
    Quote Originally Posted by Divinorumus View Post
    Magic, it's all the same stuff.
    I'd disagree, again. I guess I am in a disagreeable mood tonight. Perhaps I am just in the state of mind of the chaotic magician.

    I'm in agreement with Agrippa, so I would divide magick into lower magick, celestial magick - which I would call divination of relational models- and high magick, such as some cabalistic magick or that as practiced by the Golden Dawn - and I find, in practice, that they are all very different. I'd also include alchemy and chemistry in high magick.

    Higher magick IS the pinnacle of practice and all systems should support it, like a metaphysical Maslow's pyramid. That's really an excellent analogy.

    I would agree with Crowley that any other use of magick, IS, black magick.


    But wtf do I know?
    Last edited by Hadriana; 09-24-2007 at 01:17 PM. Reason: I hate it when I find terrible grammatical errors when someone else is quoting me.

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Not here!
    Posts
    14,403
    Quote Originally Posted by Hadriana View Post
    I'd disagree, again. I guess I am in a disagreeable mood tonight. Perhaps I am just in the state of mind of the chaotic magician.

    I'm in agreement with Agrippa, so I would divide magick into lower magick, celestial magick - which I would call divination of relational models- and high magick, such as some cabalistic magick or that as practiced by the Golden Dawn - and I find, in practice, that they are all very different. I'd also include alchemy and chemistry in high magick.

    Higher magick IS the pinnacle of practice and all systems should support it, like a metaphysical Maslow's pyramid. That's really an excellent analogy.

    I would agree with Crowley that any other uses of magick, IS, black magick.


    But wtf do I know?
    Well, that sure sounds pretty complicated, but it probably fills a lot of pages in a lot of books, and book publishers love that, as compared to how I know magic to work, which could be written on a scrap. of paper. I know all hocus pocus to work (and I mean actually works) only one way, and it's the same way magic works in a lucid dream. I suppose many made-up beliefs and stories could be wrapped around that to make it sound like something else though.
    Last edited by Divinorumus; 09-24-2007 at 04:25 AM.

  5. #31
    Delphine's Avatar
    Delphine is offline Laissez les bons temps rouler!
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    S.W. Mississippi, with part of my heart left in New Orleans
    Posts
    10,103

    Voodoo: The Monkey and the ****

    NEW ORLEANS VOODOO

    The Monkey and the ****


    The great New Orleans Voodoo magic powers of the Monkey and **** is said to grant to it's very lucky owner three significant wishes over a three year period.

    It is also said by New Orleans Voodoo practitioners and local believers in Voodoo to be the most powerful of Marie Laveau's voodoo charms, Gris Gris, Ju-Ju hex totem fetish to remove all spells and evil doing that is sent your way.




    [IMG]http://www.thehouseofvoodoo.com/item_oddities/figurines/monkey_****/images/monkey-n-****.jpg[/IMG]

    From the dark realm of African Voodoo secrets comes the legendary tale of the Sacred Monkey and the Sacred ****.

    Passed virtually unchanged in form, generation to generation, comes this strange,"Monkey and ****" haunted New Orleans Voodoo curio statue. It is associated with Marie Laveau's (I've written about Mme. Laveau in other threads) personal Zombi Brand of New Orleans Voodoo magic only. This sacred mystic curio is deeply rooted in Yoruba mythology from the African continent.


    Marie Laveau

    The Monkey and **** have long histories of bringing luck and abundance into the lives of those believers who revere their magical images on altars or in homes. Possession of the dual images entwined in the "Dance of Jubilee" is said to grant three significant wishes over a three year period to it's lucky owner.

    After the wishes have been granted, those in possession of the Monkey and **** ritually "abandon" their fortuitous friends at a crossroads or grave site where others may find and adopt them. For the new owner, the cycle of luck begins anew.


    This unique item is said to have originated with the African slaves who were dispersed throughout the world during the 17th and 18th centuries. Early examples of this carving have been found throughout Haiti and the West Indies -- wherever Voodoo thrived in the New World.


    [IMG]http://www.thehouseofvoodoo.com/item_oddities/figurines/monkey_****/images/monkey-****-altar.jpg[/IMG]

    The Monkey is a trickster figure of Yoruba mythology (Esu-Elegbara in Nigeria and Legaba among the Fon in Dahomey), who became Exu in Brazil, Echu-Elegua in Cuba, Papa Legba in the pantheon of the loa of Vaudou in Haiti, and Papa La Bas in the loa of Hoodoo in the United States). His power is in his ability to trick the future into what he wants it to be.

    The **** is a sign of power. In contemporary expressions of Santeria and Voodoo, the rooster is a favorite sacrifice to attract the favorable attention of the saintly spirits. The fact that **** is a common euphemism for the male sex organ adds to the fowl's appeal as a surrogate victim for the sacrificial knife. The ****, thus, becomes the animal symbol of Ogun.

    Some statues are made of stone, some of wood ,wax, clay. Evidently, one made of soap was once found. They have even been found carved from sandstone. The majority are of plaster, but all are similarly styled and are carved from a single piece of medium.

    They must be carved and blessed in a very involved Voodoo ritual. Examples similar to the one shown here have been dated back to the port city of New Orleans circa the mid- to late-1800's.

    These curiosities have become a significant part of the legend of the greatest Voodoo Doo Priestess of the Americas, Marie Laveau, who is said to have revered the luck-enhancing powers of this "dynamic duo."

    Many of these statues have been found perched at her burial site over the years and it is widely believed that these particular carvings are placed there by direct descendants of the Voodoo Queen and her original intimate circle of followers. Some are crudely hand-carved and some are obviously purchased, but all are said to be imbued with the same powers.

    It has been said that the lucky powers of the "Monkey and ****" statue are especially potent when given as a gift. When given to newlyweds it promotes luck in marriage and promotes true love. When given to stranger it gives good luck back to you. When given to a friend it promotes good luck to all involved.

    If you wish for money then you must put it in a bowl surrounded by money. Each day you give it your change to fill the bowl until it overflows. In a year's time you will have more money then you can imagine.


    To find true love you must carry it with you on it's birthday and whisper in it's ear what type of lover you seek.

    For protection, keep it in a safe place where no one can touch it, but can see it displayed proudly.

    It's wish making powers only work on it's birthday and you can only make one wish a year.

    It does come with one warning. Set it free on it's birthday or you will loose all you wished for. This is the rule and do not disobey it!

    The day you receive this mystic curio is considered it's Voodoo birthday. On it's birthday each year it grants you only one wish. This wish will come true before it's next birthday, as long as you respect it, care for it and keep it in a place of honor. If you don't, it will delay it, or make your life seem to move too slowly.

    One collector of the statues has found them in New Orleans cemeteries, others near the Mississippi River, or Bayou St. John (in New Orleans). They have also been found around courthouses, jails, and crossroads.

    Bianca, the Voodoo Queen of New Orleans, has said that only those of Marie Laveaus' cult still make and sell these to order.

    Bianca

    " The great power of this charm is nothing to joke at," says Bianca. "No other Voodoo or Vodoun followers make this strong charm. This is truly a secret of Marie Laveau's and no one but the direct descendents of the Queen know the secret Voodoo ritual to make this powerful wish curio statue."

    "As I am the now reigning Voodoo Queen of New Orleans Voodoo Secret Society, so it has been passed on to me alone." Says Bianca.
    "Each Monkey and **** statue curio are infused with the power of the creator--and now you can use their powers to help you through difficult times in your life."


    “I do not know if the people of the United States would vote for superior men if they ran for office, but there can be no doubt that such men do not run.”
    Alexis de Tocqueville


  6. #32
    Delphine's Avatar
    Delphine is offline Laissez les bons temps rouler!
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    S.W. Mississippi, with part of my heart left in New Orleans
    Posts
    10,103
    NEW ORLEANS VOODOO
    The Monkey and the ****


    MAGICAL FINDS AFTER KATRINA

    LOCALS ARE MYSTIFIED AS LUCKY VOODOO STATUES TURN UP IN SEVERAL LOCATIONS AROUND NEW ORLEANS
    While assisting other workers in a repair survey in downtown New Orleans, local construction worker Ray Eslick caught sight of something shiny in the scaled, caked-on mud near the edge of a Canal Street sidewalk.



    Grabbing a small survey pick, Eslick instantly went to work to uncover the mysterious object. When he pulled it from the dirt, Eslick found, to his amazement, that he held in his hand a rare and much sought-after old New Orleans Voodoo Charm: a 14-karat gold leafed Sacred Monkey and **** Statue.



    Eslick, who is employed with Boh Bros., a local construction company that has labored continuously since the onslaught of Katrina to help the city of New Orleans recover and rebuild, believes his find to be an indication that “the powers that be” are smiling on the work he and his colleagues are doing.

    “I think it’s a positive sign,” Eslick said as he displayed his find to crewmembers gathered nearby. “I know we’ve been working hard to get this city back to the way everyone wants it to be. I hope this is a sign that we’re going to be able to do that.”

    Eslick knew a little about the history of the statue from his grandmother whom, he says, once had her own Monkey and ****.

    “I can’t tell you what happened to that thing,” Eslick said. “Of course, I was little and I didn’t know anything about having to give it back [after the three year period]. Now I understand completely.”

    Asked if he would observe the ritual and abandon his find when his three years are up, Eslick hesitated and then replied, “Well, if I want to have good luck, I guess I’m going to have to. And, I think my grandma would want me to do that, so, yeah, I’m going to give it away when I’m supposed to.”

    In the meantime, however, Eslick intends to look forward to having his wishes fulfilled and to enjoying them when they do.




    “I do not know if the people of the United States would vote for superior men if they ran for office, but there can be no doubt that such men do not run.”
    Alexis de Tocqueville


  7. #33
    Delphine's Avatar
    Delphine is offline Laissez les bons temps rouler!
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    S.W. Mississippi, with part of my heart left in New Orleans
    Posts
    10,103
    NEW ORLEANS VOODOO
    The Monkey and the ****


    MAGICAL FINDS AFTER KATRINA

    Expectant Mother Finds Sacred Monkey and **** Statue in New Furnishings


    Like most New Orleanians, Colleen Decoubier evacuated with her family when Hurricane Katrina threatened New Orleans in August 2005. Over the intervening months, Decoubier agonized over whether or not to return to her hometown, a place she had known from childhood but which now seemed foreign and desolate.

    Eventually, the decision was made for her when her husband’s company became deeply involved in the recovery effort, requiring the couple to return to New Orleans.

    Though they could not return to their original home, lost to the floodwaters of the 17th Street Canal, the Decoubiers were able to find a “reasonable facsimile,” says Colleen, and determined to “start over, just like everyone else.”

    “Everything needed to be replaced,” said Colleen, now pregnant with her first child.

    “We had to wait for stores to open,” she says, “but eventually more and more locations came back. Before the storm, I had been planning a nursery around an antique baby-bed that we had purchased from some friends of my parents – a Victorian bed in a turn of the century style nursery. Of course, that bed was destroyed when the water came.”

    Decoubier was intent on recreating her dream nursery just as she had envisioned it before the storm, and she began to search for a new baby bed among the antique shops in and around Magazine Street in New Orleans. The search, however, continued to be fruitless. Then her luck changed.

    Standing in one of the endless post-Katrina grocery lines at a Metairie (a New Orleans suburb) supermarket, Colleen ran into a friend whom she was grieved to learn had lost her grandmother during the storm. The sweet elderly woman had drowned, Colleen learned, when she had refused to leave her Gentilly home.

    “We’ve been going back there cleaning up and going through stuff,” the friend said. Then a sudden thought came to her. “Would you like to have a baby bed?”

    This was the first turn of good fortune in some time and Colleen was especially excited when she and her husband went to pick up the antique, Victorian baby bed. It, and several other pieces, had survived the floodwaters in the attic of the elderly woman’s home.

    “I was happy to take it,” Colleen said. “I remember my friend’s grandmother as the sweetest person, so I was overjoyed to take something that had been so important to her.”

    Colleen did not realize at the time that fortune was about to smile again.
    When the bed was brought into her home, the first thing she did was go through the bedding, pulling it out so that she could replace it with something fresh for the new baby.



    To her amazement, there, under the tiny mattress, lay a strange little statue: a genuine Sacred Monkey and **** curio!

    “Who knows how long it might have been there?” says Colleen. “I think it was meant for me to find it!”

    Coincidentally, Colleen Decoubier, known to many as Madame Decoubier, a seer and intuitive, is descended from a long line of New Orleanians who can trace their ancestry back to French nobility and includes among her relatives descendants of the Marigny and Bienville families. Another interesting fact, which Colleen finds not so coincidental, is that, in her lifetime, Voodoo Queen Marie Laveau was hairdresser to the Decoubier females.

    “I completely understand this find to be proof that Marie Laveau is still looking over us on a very personal level,” says Colleen. “I had serious misgivings about returning to this city and having my child born here. Now I have no doubts at all: finding this Monkey and **** has erased all my misgivings!”

    The new baby is due “around Mardi Gras,” says Decoubier, who is quick to point out how much a time of renewal and celebration the festivities are for the battered city.

    “I think it means renewal all around,” she concludes. “It’s safe to go forward from here.”



    “I do not know if the people of the United States would vote for superior men if they ran for office, but there can be no doubt that such men do not run.”
    Alexis de Tocqueville


  8. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    131
    I feel cheated, that is the ****?

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    North of Midnight on Planet Wingnut
    Posts
    88,914
    Quote Originally Posted by RomanKorvinus View Post
    I feel cheated, that is the ****?

    Do unto Others as you would have them do unto you



  10. #36
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    North of Midnight on Planet Wingnut
    Posts
    88,914
    Interesting clips.....



    Also,

    Benin is the home of Voodoo.

    The ancient animist belief was taken by slaves from this tiny West African state to Haiti and New Orleans.

    Benin is the only country in the world that officially recognises Voodoo as a state religion, affording it the same national status as Christianity or Islam. But, as Unreported World reveals,

    Voodoo is trapping thousands in poverty and causing some families to sell their children in to slavery. Seen by its adherents as traditional belief that connects them to their land, culture and ancestors, Voodoo is a complex set of beliefs and obligations that, it is claimed, has helped enforce religious and social order for more than 4,000 years.

    However, as reporter Evan Williams and director James Brabazon discover, it is frequently perpetuated by threats, fear and even the kidnapping of young children


    link

    Do unto Others as you would have them do unto you



  11. #37
    Delphine's Avatar
    Delphine is offline Laissez les bons temps rouler!
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    S.W. Mississippi, with part of my heart left in New Orleans
    Posts
    10,103

    VooDoo Ritual

    Prosecutors: Queens mother Marie Lauradin peformed voodoo fire ritual that

    left daughter, 6, scarred


    NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
    Updated Thursday, June 18th 2009, 1:08 PM

    Determined to drive the evil spirits out of her daughter, a Queens mom performed a bizarre voodoo fire ritual that left the 6-year-old girl scarred for life, prosecutors say.

    Frantzcia Saintil was "engulfed in flames," but Marie Lauradin was deaf to her daughter's screams as she let the girl burn, Queens District Attorney Richard Brown charged Thursday.

    Eventually, Frantzcia's grandmother doused the flames with frigid water, but instead of getting the girl help they put her to bed, Brown said.

    Frantzcia remained there for a day before another relative begged them to take the little girl to the hospital, Brown said.

    When doctors finally saw her, Frantzcia had second- and third-degree burns covering 25% of her body, including her face, torso and legs, court papers state.

    Lauradin, 29, a Haitian immigrant, was charged in Queens criminal court with assault and endangering the welfare of a child. She faces up to 25 years in prison if convicted.

    "She denies these allegations," lawyer Jeff Cohen said as the proceedings were translated into Creole for the mother. "This is my client's only child. My client would not hurt her."

    Lauradin, who has been in the U.S. for barely a year, listened impassively as the judge ordered her held on $50,000 bail. She was also slapped with an order of protection, barring her from any contact with her damaged daughter.

    Frantzcia's grandmother, 70-year-old Sylvenie Thessier, was expected to charged later with reckless endangerment and endangering welfare of a child. She faces up to seven years in prison.

    A friend nicknamed "Sketch" helped the women stage the reckless Feb. 4 ritual but was not named or charged with a crime.

    Frantzcia was placed into a medically-induced coma as part of her treatment - a state of suspended animation from which she recently emerged.

    She is now in foster care.

    "The child has suffered permanent scarring both physically and emotionally," Brown said.

    Frantzcia was at her home in Queens Village when her mother began performing a ritual that Brown called "Loa."

    The Loa are actually spirits in the Voodoo religion who, like Christian saints, serve as intermediaries between God and mankind, according to various Web sites.

    Lauradin sprayed a circle of rum on the floor around her daughter and ignited it, police said. Then she poured some of it on the girl's head - and pushed her into the flaming circle.

    Confronted by cops, Lauradin initially claimed she was boiling rice in a pot when the girl "startled" her, causing her to spill the scalding water on her, Brown said.

    Lauradin also said it was her mom's idea to give Frantzcia a bath and put her to bed instead of taking her immediately to the hospital. She claimed she didn't even notice the girl was burned until they got to the emergency room.

    Brown said they learned the truth after Frantzcia told her foster caregiver what really happened.


    “I do not know if the people of the United States would vote for superior men if they ran for office, but there can be no doubt that such men do not run.”
    Alexis de Tocqueville


  12. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1

    How much later in life?

    Quote Originally Posted by Skookum View Post
    Marie Leveau is a complicated and fascinating figure in New Orleans history. Though she is famous even today as one of the most powerful Voodoo priestesses who ever lived, few hard facts are known about her life. Close scrutiny reveals many contradictions and fantastic legends about Marie Leveau, but even tales which a skeptic might find difficult to accept pale next to the proven facts of this remarkable and powerful woman's life.

    Marie Leveau's best documented exploit involved the murder trial of a young Creole gentleman, a trial which was almost certain to end in a guilty verdict for the young man. His powerful (and skeptical) father approached Marie and promised her anything if she could rescue his son. Marie agreed, asking for the man's New Orleans house in return. He agreed, and Marie secretly placed several charms throughout the courtroom. When his son was declared not guilty, the gentleman gave her his house as promised, and Marie Leveau gained the instant attention of the city's elite.


    Later in life, in another well-documented event, Marie is known to have helped the wounded during the Battle of New Orleans and was so noted for her efforts that she was invited to the state funeral of General Jean Humbert, a hero from that battle.
    Marie Leveau is a figure shrouded in mystery. She was a Voodoo priestess and a devoted Catholic.

    http://ame2.asu.edu/sites/voodoodreams/marie_laveau.asp
    Marie Laveau was born in 1794. The Battle of New Orleans was fought in 1814, when she was only 20 years old, so how much later in life and what/where is the documentation? Furthermore, General Humbert did fight for the Americans in the Battle of New Orleans, but as a volunteer private, and he is hardly remembered as a hero - that is reserved for Andrew Jackson.

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    1958 South 950 East
    Posts
    1
    New Orleans still practices voodoo. Modern voodoo has evolved in many ways.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •